Academic program – Top 100 Programs http://top100programs.com/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 12:15:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://top100programs.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png Academic program – Top 100 Programs http://top100programs.com/ 32 32 Harper College program teaches professional skills to students with mild intellectual disabilities https://top100programs.com/harper-college-program-teaches-professional-skills-to-students-with-mild-intellectual-disabilities/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 13:35:18 +0000 https://top100programs.com/harper-college-program-teaches-professional-skills-to-students-with-mild-intellectual-disabilities/ When Eric Hiller graduated from high school, his mother wanted to find him the best program. She knew that Eric, who has autism, would struggle in a traditional academic setting, benefiting most from a program focused on so-called soft skills. When she heard about the Career Skills Institute (CSI) at Harper College, she knew Eric […]]]>

When Eric Hiller graduated from high school, his mother wanted to find him the best program. She knew that Eric, who has autism, would struggle in a traditional academic setting, benefiting most from a program focused on so-called soft skills.

When she heard about the Career Skills Institute (CSI) at Harper College, she knew Eric would be a perfect fit for her.

“Every time Eric starts something new, there is a [resistance]”Said Agatha Donaldson-Hiller of Elgin.” Her first words are, “I can’t do it” and my response was, “How do you know you can’t do it until you try? “

CSI, which will be celebrating its 10th anniversary next fall, is a program for those who were in special education in high school and could not take traditional college classes, said Linda Hoeck, former program coordinator, who recently took up her post. retirement. Graduates do not earn a degree but, after completing a two-year program with a defined course of study, receive a portfolio assessment and certificate of completion, which shares their academic and professional skills and any support they might need. For example, this may indicate that a graduate can work on an assembly line if they have a checklist or video template.

Young adult students in the program have a range of diagnoses, Hoeck said, including general mental impairment, Down syndrome, and traumatic brain injury. A few have health problems or, like Eric, have autism.

Because Harper was a new school, the first few days at the institute were tough, said Eric, 24. He did know a classmate, however, which made the transition a bit easier.

Eventually, he grew up enjoying attending CSI. He liked a tongue twister game, where he was instructed to say a sentence faster and faster, and he saw how CSI helped him in his work. Eric has been working as a clerk at Ace Hardware in Bartlett since 2015. He categorizes and organizes merchandise, and helps customers by directing them to coworkers who can best help them.

CSI “taught me that it is important to be on time, to listen, to ask for help, to help others, to follow the rules and to get along with colleagues”, did he declare.

The institute also teaches students about technology, an area that was strengthened last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Hoeck said the switch to virtual learning for fall 2020, which has turned into a hybrid virtual / in-person approach, was difficult for some ICS students, who may not be familiar with the technology. or don’t like to disrupt the routine.

To ease the transition, Hoeck visited each of his students’ homes with a packet of information to explain the change. She told the students that they would still see each other, but that it would be online through Webex.

With the change, students learned the importance of responding to emails, completing homework by email, and asking for help if they couldn’t log into the system.

Hoeck, who retired on September 29, founded the Career Skills Institute in the fall of 2012 at the behest of Harper College and its then president, Dr. Ken Ender. She had also recently retired from the Northwest Suburban Special Education Organization (NSSEO) in Mount Prospect, a special education cooperative. She had been the Autism Coordinator at NSSEO, meaning she knew many autistic students – and their parents. In Illinois, people with autism can attend public school until the age of 22, but it can be difficult to find a program for them.

“When some of the parents called Harper’s president to say, ‘What can we do? “He wanted someone who knew those parents to participate,” Hoeck said.

Over the years, the program has changed a bit. In addition to the shift to tech skills work, students now get a long lunch break to help them become more involved on campus. There are social activities to encourage them to explore Harper and help students get to know each other.

“The other part that we’ve really worked on and formalized is the job application process,” Hoeck said. “Internships are something that has really grown here,” and students who apply for jobs at Harper go through the same application process as anyone else. They learn how to upload their resumes, interview, use email, and respond to messages.

“It has been a very important element for us,” she said. “It helped them apply for real jobs in the community.”

Eric has learned a plethora of skills at CSI, and Agatha said she has seen one of the most surprising changes this summer. His mom said Eric’s biggest struggle was communication. During Eric’s CSI graduation, she watched him sit down with one of his teachers and have a conversation.

“I just sat in awe. I don’t understand [fluid conversation] Eric, she said. That’s what I want from him. It is difficult to get him to verbalize. I want it so much for him. “

To learn more about the Career Skills Institute, visit the program home page or contact Sharon Basten, Program Coordinator, at (847) 925-2076 or sbasten@harpercollege.edu.


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“Fuente part 2” is the risk that virtually all college programs assume https://top100programs.com/fuente-part-2-is-the-risk-that-virtually-all-college-programs-assume/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 15:34:53 +0000 https://top100programs.com/fuente-part-2-is-the-risk-that-virtually-all-college-programs-assume/ You can basically lump college programs into different levels: national title contenders + seriously serious ones, P5 conference title contenders and those would be respectable P5s, you get the idea. Focusing on contenders for national and conference titles, the Platonic ideal is someone who has experience as a head coach and has a proven track […]]]>

You can basically lump college programs into different levels: national title contenders + seriously serious ones, P5 conference title contenders and those would be respectable P5s, you get the idea. Focusing on contenders for national and conference titles, the Platonic ideal is someone who has experience as a head coach and has a proven track record at this level, that is, say they have already won P5 conference titles or national titles.

The problem is, there are very few of them on the market and they have huge prices associated with them. So you end up taking a coordinator from a proven winner, or a head coach from a winner down the line, which carries the risk that they won’t be able to replicate the success they’ve had. in their previous job. , for lack of experience. Even the big programs – Oklahoma, Georgia, Ohio State, Texas, Florida – have all done this at some point in the past two decades. Sometimes it worked, others not. Honestly, the only proven P5 head coaches I can think of recently who have been hired elsewhere at the same level are Jimbo Fisher and Jim Harbaugh. UCF Getting Gus Malzahn is a higher-to-lower level move that’s as odd as Buzz Williams at VT was back then.

(In response to this message from millmtnhokie)

Posted: 12/10/2021 11:25 AM


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KCPS Middle College program uses education to overcome adversity https://top100programs.com/kcps-middle-college-program-uses-education-to-overcome-adversity/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:41:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/kcps-middle-college-program-uses-education-to-overcome-adversity/ KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The “traditional” path for a high school student is anything but these days. An increasing number of students face unique and complex life issues that do not always translate into the classroom and can end their education. Kansas City Public Schools and the Metropolitan Community College Penn Valley Campus, which partnered […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – The “traditional” path for a high school student is anything but these days.

An increasing number of students face unique and complex life issues that do not always translate into the classroom and can end their education.

Kansas City Public Schools and the Metropolitan Community College Penn Valley Campus, which partnered in 2018 to create the KCPS Middle College program, are working to bridge this adversity with education.

“Because there was a place for it – I mean there are kids who would rather come here than go to a regular high school,” said the program’s extended learning coordinator, Annette. McDonald, on the creation of the program.

KSHB

One of the first students to enter the program was Huda Alkhatib.

“It’s… amazing, how seriously, this program saved my life,” Alkhatib said.

Alkhatib was 20 years old and in the 10e at East High School when she told her counselor, “I can’t do this anymore.”

“Whenever a student knew my age, he [would] start laughing and told me you won’t make it, you won’t graduate because you’re too old, ”Alkhatib said.

These students knew Alkhatib’s age but not his history.

In 2013, following the war in Syria, she and her family had to leave for Egypt, and three years later she would come to Kansas City through Jewish Family Services, with English as a second language. .

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Courtesy of: Huda Alkhatib

When Alkhatib arrived, because she had no papers from her previous school, she was placed in the ninth grade.

“And when I came, to be honest, we asked if you needed papers from my home country, they said no, you’re good,” Alkhatib said.

But when she tried to solve the problem of which class she should technically be in, Alkhatib said documents were suddenly requested.

“My school is down now, I can’t get anything. My school dropped out because of the bombing, ”she said.

It was this kind of life issue that almost kept Alkhatib from finishing high school.

Fortunately, an educator working on the launch of a then new program recruited Alkhatib to be one of the first students.

“I don’t want to choke on myself, but it’s a big deal,” McDonald said. “They tell me ‘you can’t come here anymore’, ‘you’re too old’, ‘you won’t be able to graduate from high school’, then she stayed with me and we got her. It’s a big problem.

Huda at MCC Penn Valley.jpg

Courtesy of: Huda Alkhatib

“Even if you have a lot of problems in your life, no matter what, just go get your high school diploma, finish your education,” said Alkhatib, who is determined to help rebuild her home country. “Like me, from a country at war, I wanted to give up, but I didn’t because I will probably go back to my country one day and help them and the only way to do that is through my education. “

A new cohort of students now sits down where Alkhatib once was, but is never more than a few feet away to guide them as an administrative assistant for the KCPS Middle College program. He has a year to go before he can get his coding and billing medical certificate.

Huda Alkhatib.jpg

KSHB

Huda Alkhatib has graduated from high school and is a year overdue for her medical coding and billing certification. Alkhatib is part of the first cohort of students in the KCPS Middle College program.

Students who are in similar situations don’t always find someone like Annette McDonald.

McDonald said she has to thank the administration for supporting the program.

“Dr Lee and Dr Bedell, Dr Lee is the president here at MCC and our superintendent – [they had] that kind of compassion to know that school isn’t always square, that it doesn’t always have to happen in the same place it has happened for 100 years and [were] willing to take a risk because it was a big risk, ”McDonald said.

MCC’s Penn Valley campus not only provides a space to learn, but also helps students earn college credit while completing high school.

The KCPS Middle College program is a partnership between the MCC Penn Valley Campus, KCPS, and the Full Employment Council, providing services that help prepare for the HiSET exam, post-secondary options, and a path to a two-year degree program. at MCC and Career-Technical training and certification.

The next KCPS Middle College Screening Assessment Program is scheduled for Tuesday, October 12 and Wednesday, October 13, from 7:45 a.m. to noon at MCC – Penn Valley Campus, located in room 503 of the Campus Center.

A seat can be reserved by texting (816) 803-6356 or calling (816) 604-4019.

Since the inception of the program in 2018, 229 students have graduated.

The program has an 83% graduation rate.


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Algoma Steel invests $ 100,000 in Sault College program (updated) https://top100programs.com/algoma-steel-invests-100000-in-sault-college-program-updated/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 19:23:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/algoma-steel-invests-100000-in-sault-college-program-updated/ Algoma Steel invests $ 100,000 in college mechatronics engineering program The CEO of Algoma Steel says the company is preparing for its future needs by investing now in a Sault College program that offers hands-on experience in cutting-edge technologies, like robotics. “It is very important that we have the future worker who can be educated […]]]>

Algoma Steel invests $ 100,000 in college mechatronics engineering program

The CEO of Algoma Steel says the company is preparing for its future needs by investing now in a Sault College program that offers hands-on experience in cutting-edge technologies, like robotics.

“It is very important that we have the future worker who can be educated and provide them with the opportunity to acquire the skills and for us to get the workforce, especially locally,” said Michael McQuade, Head of the management of Algoma Steel Inc. in an announcement Wednesday. at the College of Sault.

Algoma Steel is donating $ 100,000 to the college for its new mechatronic engineering program, which is being offered at The Sault for the first time this year through a partnership with Humber College.

The newly announced funds will be used to purchase new teaching materials to allow more local students to gain hands-on experience.

Program coordinator Donovan Kennedy said the inaugural class consists of around 65 students, four of whom are educated in Sault, the majority attending a Humber campus in Etobicoke.

Kennedy said the four-year program provides students with a good programming foundation for a variety of applications, including heavy industry, manufacturing, agriculture, and others.

“They are learning about a real industrial robot, something they would see in industry,” Kennedy said. “With a degree in mechatronics, they have this background in electricity, automation, and programming, all built into that degree. “

A small-scale ABB teaching robot used at the college as part of the program was present for the announcement.

McQuade said Algoma Steel anticipates future needs for skilled workers as it continues to modernize the plant.

“With that comes new technology where we need employees who can work with that technology and keep it up to date,” McQuade said. “It made a lot of sense to invest where you combine mechanical, electrical and IT factors in the types of automation that we are seeing.”

He hopes that investing in the program will help provide more residents with the skills they need to stay in the community and work for Algoma Steel.

“We are excited to be able to support our community and the next generation of innovators who will emerge from this program,” said McQuade.

The investment in the program is just another example of a long-standing partnership with Algoma Steel, said Ron Common, president of Sault College.

“They have been close partners for decades and they sit on our advisory committees, they sit on our board of directors, they help us keep our programs up to date and create employment opportunities for our graduates,” Common said. . “They’re thinking about new kinds of skills that engineers will need. “


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Hancock College program helps students tackle food insecurity https://top100programs.com/hancock-college-program-helps-students-tackle-food-insecurity/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/hancock-college-program-helps-students-tackle-food-insecurity/ SANTA MARIA, Calif .– Allan Hancock College is helping students tackle food insecurity with a weekly food sharing program. Held every Thursday, the program provides students in need with prepackaged products and non-perishable foods. “These are things that will help them get through the week,” said Henry Schroff, student activities specialist at Hancock College. “Every […]]]>

SANTA MARIA, Calif .– Allan Hancock College is helping students tackle food insecurity with a weekly food sharing program.

Held every Thursday, the program provides students in need with prepackaged products and non-perishable foods.

“These are things that will help them get through the week,” said Henry Schroff, student activities specialist at Hancock College. “Every week they can come back for food. This program helps our students who have feeding problems or don’t have money for food, so they definitely will.”

The program was in place before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, with the aim of addressing student food insecurity.

Since the start of the pandemic in March 2020, the need for the program has increased.

“We are seeing a significantly greater need for students,” said Schroff. “With the pandemic, I think the needs are higher, so we’ve seen a larger student population.”

Food for the student portion of food is provided by the Santa Barbara County Food Bank.

“We get a lot of fruits and veg, which I love,” said student Danielle Denton. “A lot of them are fresh from our local areas so it’s really cool. I get peanut butter all the time so we get a lot of really good fresh healthy food.”

Denton added that the food sharing service is particularly useful given the rise in grocery expenses.

“The food sharing program really means a lot, especially as a mom, I have a five year old at home, so being a student and a mom is really, really hard,” Denton said. “I really appreciate the fact that the school gives us free food.”

Hancock College hosts the program at its two campuses every Thursday, in Santa Maria at 1:30 p.m. and in Lompoc at 2:30 p.m.

“We’re really trying to get the word out to all the students,” Schroff said. “We’ve been texting and social media, but it’s still not reaching the students. We want them to know we’re there for them. We can provide any service they may need and the service will actually go quite well. far .”

Food is distributed at both sites by student ambassadors, who donate their time to make the program work.

“They get first-hand experience of what it means to give back to the community, so it’s a lesson for life,” said volunteer Shirley Hinzo. “It’s time very well spent.”

Any student at Hancock College is entitled to receive free food.

The college also hosts a drive-through food sharing event for all community members on the third Saturday of each month at 10 a.m.


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COVID-19 outbreak declared in St. Clair College program https://top100programs.com/covid-19-outbreak-declared-in-st-clair-college-program/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/covid-19-outbreak-declared-in-st-clair-college-program/ Windsor, Ont. – The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit declared a COVID-19 outbreak in a program at St. Clair College on Wednesday. A new statement from the college and health unit says the program’s outbreak is affecting two different semesters on the South Windsor campus. The COVID-19 outbreak has been linked to exposure in two cohorts. […]]]>

Windsor, Ont. –

The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit declared a COVID-19 outbreak in a program at St. Clair College on Wednesday.

A new statement from the college and health unit says the program’s outbreak is affecting two different semesters on the South Windsor campus.

The COVID-19 outbreak has been linked to exposure in two cohorts.

The college says affected students and staff have been informed and directed to self-monitoring or self-isolation.

WEHCU declares an outbreak at school when there are two or more related cases and if there is evidence that at least one case could have been infected in the same classroom.

The college says it is working closely with the health unit to manage the outbreak in this specific program and any other identified cases.

St. Clair College has an immunization policy in place that requires students to be fully immunized or take rapid tests every 72 hours. The college says it also requires daily quizzes for staff and students before entering campus.

On Wednesday, the college said 80.5 percent of students were fully vaccinated, 12.9 percent had at least one dose, and 6.6 percent had chosen not to vaccinate or to disclose their status at the college.


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The League’s pre-university program brought positive experiences, increased enrollment https://top100programs.com/the-leagues-pre-university-program-brought-positive-experiences-increased-enrollment/ Tue, 07 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/the-leagues-pre-university-program-brought-positive-experiences-increased-enrollment/ Get the latest Syracuse news delivered straight to your inbox. Subscribe to our newsletter here. Ethan Davis was months away from traveling to Syracuse for the pre-college program on the Syracuse University campus when the university moved the program to a virtual format due to the pandemic. Davis, now a freshman in drama at SU, […]]]>

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Ethan Davis was months away from traveling to Syracuse for the pre-college program on the Syracuse University campus when the university moved the program to a virtual format due to the pandemic.

Davis, now a freshman in drama at SU, participated in the musical theater program in the summer semester during his freshman year of high school in 2020. Although Davis was initially discouraged that the In-person aspect of the program was canceled, he still believes it had a positive experience, he said.

The pandemic has forced SU campus pre-university program, which gives high school students the option of taking courses in college with either academic credit or no credit to uncover potential majors in college, to operate virtually for both summer 2020 and 2021.

In 2020, the majority of the country’s pre-college programs were operating virtually, said Chris Cofer, executive director of the SU’s Office of Pre-College Programs. It became clear in December 2020 that operating in person during the summer of 2021 was still not possible, Cofer said.

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“We made the decision (to cancel the program) very cautiously and given the planned schedule for the vaccine distribution (to adolescents) at that time,” Cofer said.

First-year musical theater major Maggie Stephens also participated in the pre-college program in the summer of 2020. She said she struggled to form friendships virtually, but was happy with it. the academic aspect of the program.

“I loved the lessons and meeting the teachers,” Stephens said. “It’s a huge reason why I’m currently a student at Syracuse… It was nice to be able to get a very in-depth education crammed into that three week period, but also from my home.”

Likewise, Davis said he learned a lot throughout the program, although he said his program was not intended for the virtual format.

“The way they set it up was always very informative for me and my learning,” Davis said. It was a little disappointing because the theater is such an in-person activity.

However, moving the program to an online setting has allowed it to become accessible to more students around the world, Cofer said. Enrollment has grown from 717 students during the in-person version of the program in 2019 to 832 students in 2020 and 835 in 2021 during the distance versions of the program.

Maya Goosman | Director of digital design

While the operation of the pre-college program virtually allows for greater accessibility, it has had a negative impact on the social and independent aspects of student experiences, Cofer said.

“Providing high school students with a full residential experience does a lot for their personal development,” Cofer said. “The online social and recreational activities we have offered for them, while of high quality, cannot replace the experience of living on campus away from home and parents. “

Stephens only found out about the program after the in-person game was canceled, so she never expected to attend it virtually. Being from Utica, New York, she was already familiar with the SU campus and community.

“For the students, (a) a big part of the reason they went to summer college was to get a feel for the campus and whether or not they want to live there for four years. (Being virtual) could have been a problem, but I already knew I liked the campus, ”Stephens said.

The pre-college program is designed to give high school students an overview of what college is all about. While Stephens said the virtual program lacked some of the typical aspects of college face-to-face, it still helped her prepare for college life.

“If I had been in person… it would have given me a better understanding (college), because I would have lived in a dormitory, I would have had to find a way to get to class,” Stephens said. “My first days here were a challenge that I had to overcome. “

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Contact Shantel: [email protected] | @ shantelguzman2



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Union County University Program Roles With COVID Changes https://top100programs.com/union-county-university-program-roles-with-covid-changes/ Tue, 17 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/union-county-university-program-roles-with-covid-changes/ UNION COUNTY, NC – A Union County University prep program designed to spark interest in STEM degrees and careers has had to reinvent itself this summer thanks to COVID-19. The TRIO Upward Bound math and science program, led by Bishop Osco Gardin at his New Covenant Community Development Center, allows students to take core classes […]]]>

UNION COUNTY, NC – A Union County University prep program designed to spark interest in STEM degrees and careers has had to reinvent itself this summer thanks to COVID-19.

The TRIO Upward Bound math and science program, led by Bishop Osco Gardin at his New Covenant Community Development Center, allows students to take core classes each morning for five weeks during a summer program, then d ” have elective courses.

Elective courses include a preparation course for the SAT, as well as robotics. At the end of the five weeks, students go on a university tour to get a taste of the campus experience. This year, they visited schools in South Carolina after COVID-19 made it difficult to visit Washington, DC area schools as originally planned.

This was just one of many changes caused by the pandemic, which impacted this year’s program.

When Michelle Jimenez’s mother asked her to spend six weeks in a summer program, Jimenez, soon to be in her final year of high school, was not impatient at first.

“I was unsure about that, I didn’t really want to, because you know, it’s school. I wanted to end this. And it’s summer, supposed to have fun, ”Jimenez said during a robotic break.

But five weeks later, she’s glad she did.

” I do not regret it. I really like it here. I have met so many new people and everyone here is so warm and welcoming. And I just— I fell in love with this program, I love it, I’m just glad I joined you know !? Jimenez added.

The program is open and intended for first generation students, from low income families, in grades 9-11.

For Jimenez, she hopes this is a preview of what is to come in her future education.

“I’m really excited, ready to go to college, you know?” Start a whole new life, start shaping my life, have my stuff and everything. I have always been independent too. So really excited for that, ”Jimenez said.

Jimenez is a rising senior in Union County, hoping to one day become a police detective.

“I always wanted to be a police inspector. Growing up, I had a difficult childhood, I had a few… things going on. I’ve been involved with cops all the time, so cops have actually been a big part of my life, ”Jimenez added.

Usually three weeks of the program take place on the Wingate University campus so that students can have the full university experience. This means that they would stay in dormitories, keep a rotating schedule, and eat in mess rooms.

Thanks to COVID-19, the element on campus could not happen this summer. Instead, Gardin hosted the students for the five weeks at his New Covenant center, located next to his church, Elizabeth Missionary Baptist Church.

Jimenez would be the first person on his mother’s side to go to college. It is a responsibility that she does not take lightly, knowing that she sets an example for her cousins.

“I know it’s not easy. I know you go there without knowing anything, ”Jimenez said with a laugh.

She still got a taste of the college experience. This year’s summer program concluded with a tour of colleges in South Carolina, particularly those located in the Charleston area.

In the past, the program has visited schools in cities like Atlanta and New Orleans.

“They have no experience or knowledge of what university is. Their parents have no experience or knowledge of what college is. So we’re trying to give them that experience by placing them on the college campus, ”Gardin said of the program.

Currently there are around 50 children enrolled in the program as it is about to start its fifth year of school. The TRIO Upward Bound Math and Science program is funded by the United States Department of Education.

During the school year, the program offers regular tutoring and Academic Saturdays two weekends per month.

Gardin said that since he started the program in 2016, all students are still enrolled in the university except for one who joined the military.


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Looking to grow in a pot? A CT college program can teach you how https://top100programs.com/looking-to-grow-in-a-pot-a-ct-college-program-can-teach-you-how-2/ Wed, 11 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/looking-to-grow-in-a-pot-a-ct-college-program-can-teach-you-how-2/ Christopher J. Tuccio has seen students graduate from his horticulture program and pursue careers in medical marijuana dispensaries in Connecticut or recreational dispensaries in Massachusetts. Now, students at Naugatuck Valley Community College can take a course that teaches them how to grow marijuana plants. The college joins a number of higher education institutions in the […]]]>

Christopher J. Tuccio has seen students graduate from his horticulture program and pursue careers in medical marijuana dispensaries in Connecticut or recreational dispensaries in Massachusetts.

Now, students at Naugatuck Valley Community College can take a course that teaches them how to grow marijuana plants.

The college joins a number of higher education institutions in the state, including UConn, offering courses related to cannabis.

“We kind of gave them plant growing skills and they have to adapt to the job,” said Tuccio, horticulture program coordinator and horticulture professor in the community college’s STEM division. “Now that’s really useful. We can train them specifically for the jobs that are out there, which is a lot right now. “

Called Horticulture of Cannabis, the course is the same one offered at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Danielson, which started offering a cannabis studies program last year.


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NDCS new recruit class includes college program graduates https://top100programs.com/ndcs-new-recruit-class-includes-college-program-graduates/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/ndcs-new-recruit-class-includes-college-program-graduates/ By CN personnel LINCOLN, Neb. — Three graduates of the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services (NDCS) new recruit class are kind of trailblazers. They are the first to complete the agency’s Staff Training Academy (STA) under the Corrections Workforce Development Pathways (CWDP) partnership between NDCS and Peru State College. The program offers $ 15,000 in […]]]>

By CN personnel

LINCOLN, Neb. — Three graduates of the Nebraska Department of Correctional Services (NDCS) new recruit class are kind of trailblazers. They are the first to complete the agency’s Staff Training Academy (STA) under the Corrections Workforce Development Pathways (CWDP) partnership between NDCS and Peru State College. The program offers $ 15,000 in tuition and an annual stipend to students who choose a career in criminal justice. While completing their classroom work in pursuit of their degree, students work as interns at Tecumseh State Correctional Facility (TSCI).

A total of 16 students graduated from Whitehall School on Tuesday, July 13, 2021. In addition to offering his congratulations, Governor Pete Ricketts told friends and family in attendance that they were essential in supporting those. who wanted to enter a difficult and stimulating profession.

“The NDCS partnership with the State of Peru is a unique initiative to connect talented students with opportunities in the state’s criminal justice system,” Governor Ricketts said. “The learning model provides students with the first-hand experience and on-the-job skills necessary to excel in a career in our correctional service. We are delighted to celebrate the program’s first graduates as they join our state team.

Peruvian State President Dr Michael Evans said the ceremony represented the culmination of a lot of hard work, dedication and determination on the part of the students.

“They should be rightly proud of this honor. The State of Peru offers talented students the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to meet the critical needs of the state and region, and these students are well prepared to launch impressive careers. We look forward to seeing them contribute to Tecumseh and beyond in any meaningful way. “

By keeping an eye on his future career goals, the program with the State of Peru and the NDCS will allow Gabriel Stolinski to pay the costs of his studies and, at the same time, gain the necessary professional experience. “I’ve always wanted to serve the public in one way or another because I come from a family with a lot of public servants,” Stolinski said. “Working for the Department of Corrections will allow me to do that and it will be a stepping stone to law enforcement. “

Paw Wah said he also recognizes that enrolling in the program is a unique opportunity. “It gives me a chance to work at TSCI to prepare myself for the reality of how the justice system works with the incarcerated population and help me gain more experiences.”

According to NDCS Director Scott R. Frakes, it is these experiences that will enable students to build careers in corrections. “Some people come into this field with the idea that it’s just a job. But there are many opportunities to learn leadership skills and promote. “

Frakes highlighted the directors and members of his leadership team, many of whom have decades of experience under their belt. “They have built lifelong careers in corrections, while serving the public good in a meaningful way. “

Students must apply to the program and are interviewed by representatives from Peru State College and NDCS, prior to selection. Those selected work part-time as agents at TSCI while attending school, with an opportunity for full-time employment after graduation.

“As their knowledge of corrections deepens and they gain more experience during the program, students will be able to join NDCS as first level supervisors,” Frakes explained. “The long-term value is the development of a cohort of highly educated and skilled correctional leaders, ready to meet the challenges of successfully leading the correctional workforce.

Cherise Womelsdorf said she is looking for a career that is personally fulfilling for her. This scholarship program does the trick.

“I always thought that the corrections would be part of my experience process,” said Womelsdorf. “As a single mom, I wasn’t sure how I was going to balance the kids, being a full-time student and a full-time commitment to the department. This program is convenient for me.

Over the course of the six weeks spent together, the students learned the various essentials of corrections – things like reinstatement, clinical treatment, behavioral health, classification, legal issues and more. Although they will not occupy armed positions, the students have been trained in the use of a firearm. They were also certified in CPR / first aid and learned self defense techniques.

“The students in the state of Peru were exposed to all the training that we would pass on to any other team member with immediate contact with the prison population,” Frakes noted.

Four more students from the state of Peru are completing their training at the academy and will also graduate in the coming weeks.


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