Academic program – Top 100 Programs http://top100programs.com/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 16:24:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://top100programs.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-8-120x120.png Academic program – Top 100 Programs http://top100programs.com/ 32 32 Western Nevada College program ranked 9th in the United States https://top100programs.com/western-nevada-college-program-ranked-9th-in-the-united-states/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:51:36 +0000 https://top100programs.com/western-nevada-college-program-ranked-9th-in-the-united-states/ Geoscience professor Dr. Winnie Kortemeier handed out ‘wonder stones’ at the Welcome Back Week club fair. A higher education consulting organization has recognized Western Nevada College’s online graphic design certificate program among the top 10 in the United States.Student Navigating Education ranked WNC ninth in the nation among online graphic design certificate programs.“I strive to […]]]>

Geoscience professor Dr. Winnie Kortemeier handed out ‘wonder stones’ at the Welcome Back Week club fair.

A higher education consulting organization has recognized Western Nevada College’s online graphic design certificate program among the top 10 in the United States.
Student Navigating Education ranked WNC ninth in the nation among online graphic design certificate programs.
“I strive to keep the curriculum up-to-date and relevant,” said WNC graphic design professor Jayna Conkey.
Other colleges and universities ranked in the top 10 include the University of Massachusetts-Lowell at No. 1, Southern Methodist University at No. 2, and the University of Texas at Austin at No. 3.
To learn more about WNC’s honor for its Graphic Design Program, go to https://successfulstudent.org/online-graphic-design-certificate-programs/.
The successful student serves as a source to help students make education meaningful and meaningful. Its goal is to help students navigate the higher education landscape. Successful Students provides students with an online resource for informed college and degree rankings.
For more information, contact Conkey at Jayna.Conkey@wnc.edu….

(In the gallery below, the posters were created as part of WNC’s Graphic Design program, which was recently recognized as one of the top 10 online graphic design certificate programs in the country. The name of the artist appears under the poster.)



Open enrollment courses offer flexibility
For the current fall semester, students can enroll in open-entry classes until the ninth week of the semester.
Flexible registration deadlines for open-entry courses allow students to work at a pace that will guarantee course and assignment completion.
Some of the open-entry subjects WNC currently offers include Applied Industrial Technology, Anthropology, Aviation, Construction Management, English Language, Environmental Science, Electronic Technology, Information Systems , mathematics, music, leisure and physical education, philosophy, political science and psychology. For courses offered in these areas and course descriptions, go to https://www.wnc.edu/class-schedule/?sorter=open#class-schedule-row.


The nursing program welcomes 56 students
Nursing & Allied Health welcomed 56 students into its nursing program with an orientation day late last month.
Admission to the two-year Associate of Applied Science in Nursing program is an accomplishment. There were 101 qualified applicants this year.
Students who apply are ranked according to a points system. Points are earned for their grades in prerequisite and co-requisite science courses, as well as other necessary courses taken prior to admission. Applicants also receive one point for being a resident of Nevada.
Because science courses are weighted more than others, WNC Nursing & Allied Health Acting Director Deborah Ingraffia-Strong recommends students retake them to get the highest grade possible. Grades below “C” are not accepted.
Although the curriculum for the program is the same this year, instructors and professors will incorporate new Laerdal high-fidelity simulation dummies provided through grants.
“Models are breathing, sweating and blinking,” Ingraffia-Strong said.
Between the second and third semesters of the program, many nursing students are hired at the clinical sites where they train.
“Due to labor shortages, many employers have increased their number of nursing apprentices,” Ingraffia-Strong said. “As apprentice nurses, they can do a lot, like give medications while they work as nurses within the framework that the Nevada Board of Nursing has set for them.”
Two new instructors help students reach their potential: Susan Ward and Irene Jen Schiller. Ward returns as a full-time instructor to fill Ingraffia-Strong’s position, and Schiller has a background as a working nurse, including serving in a New York City emergency room during the health pandemic.
Nearly 97 percent of graduates who successfully obtain their Nevada RN driver’s license immediately.
For more information, call 775-445-4425 or email alliedhealth@wnc.edu.

Apply for the Nevada Promise Scholarship by October 31
The Nevada Legislature has funding available through the Nevada Promise Scholarship to cover tuition and other mandatory fees, which is a savings of over $3,000 per year. The scholarship provides support for up to three years to students who apply and meet the requirements to receive the scholarship.
Nevada high school students graduating in the spring of 2023 must apply for the Nevada Promise Scholarship by October 31.
For more information, contact nvpromise@wnc.edu.
]]>
Michigan’s New Free Community College Program: What You Need to Know https://top100programs.com/michigans-new-free-community-college-program-what-you-need-to-know/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/michigans-new-free-community-college-program-what-you-need-to-know/ July 19: Deadline approaches for thousands of Michigan residents to receive free classesMay 22: Back to school: Michigan’s free tuition program attracts 70,000 peopleUpdate: Michigan has announced a free community college. Nearly 170,000 applied. In what has been described as the largest effort in state history to increase college achievement, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer on […]]]>

July 19: Deadline approaches for thousands of Michigan residents to receive free classes
May 22: Back to school: Michigan’s free tuition program attracts 70,000 people

Update: Michigan has announced a free community college. Nearly 170,000 applied.

In what has been described as the largest effort in state history to increase college achievement, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer on Tuesday unveiled a program promising free community college tuition to residents. 25 years and over.

Whitmer said about 4.1 million of Michigan’s 10 million people are eligible for Michigan Reconnect. Just under 3 million eligible people are of working age, between 25 and 64, according to census data.

“All Michiganders deserve a path to well-paying employment, whether they choose to pursue a college degree, technical certificate or apprenticeship,” Whitmer said during a virtual press conference Tuesday announcing the program.

Related:

The Whitmer administration aims to increase the percentage of working-age adults with a college degree or 49 percent to 60% by 2030. The current national average is 51%.

Here’s what to know about the program, which costs the state $30 million:

What is Michigan Reconnect?

Launched Tuesday, Michigan Reconnect is paying community college tuition and compulsory fees for Michigan residents over the age of 25.

The program also offers scholarships of up to $1,500 to help cover tuition costs for over 70 private training schools with 120 programs that offer certificates in high-demand careers in industries such as manufacturing, construction, information technology, healthcare, or business management.

Who is eligible?

You must be a Michigan resident for at least one year, have a high school diploma or equivalent, and not have previously graduated from college. Current students are eligible, as well as those who have never set foot on a college campus or who stopped taking classes before earning a degree.

Why is this important?

Michigan is below the national average for the percentage of adults with college degrees, hampering state attempts to attract business and suppressing revenue.

More education usually means higher salaries. According to data from US Bureau of Labor Statistics.

One in four Michigan adults has some college credits but no degree. Making community colleges free could entice adults who keep putting off getting a degree to return to campus.

“It’s a big deal,” said Ryan Fewins-Bliss, executive director of the Michigan College Access Network, a nonprofit that works to improve college access and affordability. “It’s amazing that people who felt left out of higher education now have an opportunity.”

How many people are likely to apply?

A similar program limited to only pandemic essential workers, called Futures for Frontliners, attracted 120,000 applications. This larger program will likely attract hundreds of thousands of applicants, Fewins-Bliss said.

Will going to university cost nothing more?

The program pays tuition and compulsory fees. Students will likely still have to pay for books, as well as things like transportation to and from class (if classes are in person).

Should I apply immediately?

Applications began on Tuesday. There is no deadline.

How long does the benefit last?

Both full-time and part-time students are eligible for Michigan Reconnect. Students are eligible for the benefit for up to four years after enrolling in their first class using Michigan Reconnect funding.

Who pays for this?

The average tuition and compulsory fees at community colleges in Michigan are around $4,000 per year, but the cost varies wildly from student to student as many community college students only take one or two classes at a time.

The state has set aside $30 million for this budget year’s program. The majority of tuition will likely be covered by Federal Pell Grants, which are college money that doesn’t have to be paid back, available to low- and middle-income families.

Pell Grants cover up to $6,195 per year for students from families with adjusted gross income of $26,000 or less. Students earning up to $60,000 are eligible for smaller Pell Grants.

Students who are ineligible for Pell grants because they earn more than $60,000, or who have tuition more than Pell will pay, will have the difference paid through state-funded Michigan Reconnect .

Community colleges can help students achieve a Free Application for Federal Student Aidwhich determines eligibility for Pell Grants.

When will these funds be available to pay tuition?

Those applying soon may be eligible for tuition this summer.

Will Michigan Reconnect pay for two years of a four-year university rather than a community college?

The program is only available to students at state community colleges and some vocational training centers. Students can, however, earn community college credits that can be transferred to a four-year school.

Has this been done elsewhere?

Tennessee has been running a similar program since 2014. There, between 16,000 and 17,000 students enroll in the university each year through the free tuition program.

Is this a program that will disappear when a new administration takes over the governor’s office?

Michigan Reconnect may be safer than some of the Democratic governor’s other initiatives because it has bipartisan support.

The program is funded for this year, but Whitmer was joined in his Tuesday announcement by Ken Horn, R-Frankenmuth, who leads the committee that would allocate future funds for Michigan Reconnect.

“It will be a high priority” on his committee, promised Horn. “The ability to find highly qualified and competent employees is more difficult than ever.”

John Walsh, CEO of the Michigan Manufacturers Association, also welcomed the initiative. “It’s in every way a win-win for everyone,” Walsh said at the press conference. “It allows our citizens to upskill and get promotions and allows employers to fill positions.”

Tennessee Reconnect has similarly broad and bipartisan support.

What is the biggest concern about the program?

Getting adults into college is great, but it doesn’t mean they’ll get a degree.

Lou Glazer, president of the Ann Arbor-based Michigan Future think tank, warned that tuition is just one barrier to earning a degree. “A lot of adults, the reason they don’t finish school is other life issues, they’re raising kids, working. So you have to structure a program so that they can lead their lives.

“Second, there are real financial costs beyond tuition, such as books and living expenses. And third, a lot of people aren’t academically ready to go back to school, and schools aren’t great at taking people who have basic academic issues and getting them to a degree.

“You have to fix all the problems (for the program) to succeed,” Glazer said.

How to apply?

You can apply here.

]]>
College program sows confidence for a career in agriculture https://top100programs.com/college-program-sows-confidence-for-a-career-in-agriculture/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 11:59:11 +0000 https://top100programs.com/college-program-sows-confidence-for-a-career-in-agriculture/ McHenry County College’s Entrepreneurial Agriculture Program has had a significant impact on students and the community since its inception just two years ago. Through a combination of food production training, business education, and connections with local producers, the program prepares both degree-seeking students and food and agriculture innovators for a prosperous and rewarding future in […]]]>

McHenry County College’s Entrepreneurial Agriculture Program has had a significant impact on students and the community since its inception just two years ago. Through a combination of food production training, business education, and connections with local producers, the program prepares both degree-seeking students and food and agriculture innovators for a prosperous and rewarding future in the economy. regional food.

“Over the past few years, we’ve seen a resurgence of interest in the farm-to-table movement and people wanting to know where their food comes from,” said Garrett Beier, director of the Department of Agriculture and of entrepreneurial horticulture at the MCC. “Many people in our community come from an agricultural background but need business courses to help them market their products or have an interest in food/agriculture but need formal training on the process growth and industry.”

For those who think this type of career might be right for them, Beier suggests a few introductory courses, including Introduction to Agriculture, Introductory Agriculture Internship, and Plant Science. “Students who choose this major could pursue careers in many areas of agriculture, including crops, animal husbandry, food production, and more,” Beier said. “It’s a great place to start if you think something like this might interest you but aren’t sure what specific area yet.”

On the horticulture side, the college offers courses in landscape and floral design as well as a new course, Specialty Crops, which will introduce students to mushroom, hop and fruit production.

Read the full article at www.dailyherald.com.

]]>
NASA College program sends students on virtual mission to the Moon https://top100programs.com/nasa-college-program-sends-students-on-virtual-mission-to-the-moon/ Thu, 18 Aug 2022 17:41:44 +0000 https://top100programs.com/nasa-college-program-sends-students-on-virtual-mission-to-the-moon/ (TNS) – Amara Ihekwoeme, a student at Butte College, got the chance of a lifetime when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration selected her to participate in a NASA project and to attend the Virtual Aerospace Scholars Experience from NASA Community College from August 3-9. “We had a mentor from NASA,” Ihekwoeme said. “I was […]]]>

(TNS) – Amara Ihekwoeme, a student at Butte College, got the chance of a lifetime when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration selected her to participate in a NASA project and to attend the Virtual Aerospace Scholars Experience from NASA Community College from August 3-9.

“We had a mentor from NASA,” Ihekwoeme said. “I was project manager and responsible for the budget.”

Ihekwoeme participated in missions where she discovered the moon and Mars. She worked with classmates and served as a project manager and budget advisor. The 10-member team had to design a mission to the moon or to Mars.


Ihekwoeme, originally from Humboldt County, has lived in Chico for six years. She is studying electrical engineering. She attended high school at Pleasant Valley High School.

Ihekwoeme said last year that her friend recommended the program to her and found it really interesting.

“We picked the moon and designed a mission. We figured out what rocket we were using and what science instruments we were using. We explored dark areas and went into caves. It was fun working with my team. They were all passionate about NASA,” Ihekwoeme said.

Ihekwoeme enjoyed working with his team.

“Overall, we were designing a mission to the moon with a rover and figuring out how much it would cost. We did some engineering design. We had to make some scientific choices; that’s how the mission went. We had a lot of Zoom meetings. There was one on the moon surface study and the rock study. It was cool to meet my team on Zoom. We opened the meeting to people. questions about how to work in a team and learned a lot”, Ihekwoeme

The team will participate in a third mission, which should arrive soon.

“We’re setting things up,” Ihekwoeme said. “The second mission was a week-long project. The first mission lasted a little over a month, where we discovered the moon and Artemis.”

Ihekoeme had to apply for the program and was later invited to the mission. NASA provided them with a course.

“It was really cool to design a rover or an airplane to help us get to the moon. I liked being part of a team,” she said.

After the third mission, Ihekoeme will concentrate on her studies and her work as a cashier in a pharmacy.

She said that this experience was a very good element to put on her CV. She is working towards obtaining a pharmacy technician license and plans to transfer to UC Davis or Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

Team members came from community colleges all over California.

“It was a bonding experience,” Ihekoeme said. “I have some of the students on LinkedIn. I would love to be part of a team again.”

Miles Strelecki, Ihekwoeme’s classmate at Butte College, said Ihekoeme was very excited about the project. He met her in the fall semester of 2021 when they took chemistry classes together.

“I know she was really looking forward to it,” Strelecki said. “She had been talking about it for over a year. It seems like she really enjoyed it. It matched her personality. She really likes math and science and is very smart.”

Strelecki said the program gives students a chance to see if they want to get into the NASA career field.

“She values ​​school a lot,” he said. “She’s really focused on the job and very dedicated.”

Ihekwoeme’s friend Jordan Bennett attended Pleasant Valley with her. They were teammates on the volleyball team.

“Amara is a very calm person,” Bennett said. “Once you get to know her, she’s one of the most special people you’ll ever meet. She’s amazing, a great person, a friend and a teammate. I think she’s grown a lot and become a more confident person. Working with strangers and being in a leadership role was good for her. I am beyond proud of her.

Bennett feels lucky to be Ihekwoeme’s friend.

“She’s so smart,” Bennett said. “Getting to know her is amazing. She’s going to be an amazing young lady. She puts her heart into her work and she does so many cool things.”

Felix Ihekwoeme, Amara Ihekwoeme’s father, is also very proud of her.

“I’m so proud of his interest and curiosity in things like NASA,” he said. “She explores engineering. She’s a curious and meticulous person. She’s very special.”

“She told me about the wording of going to Mars. As a child, she was interested in games, writing and reading books. She also likes to play Minecraft,” Felix Ihekwoeme said.

“She talked about working with computers and engineering,” Felix Ihekwoeme said. “We’ll see how it goes.”

NASA Community College Aerospace Fellows can be contacted by email at JSC-NCAS@mail.nasa.gov or by phone at 281-244-7029 or https://go.nasa.gov/ncas.

©2022 Chico Enterprise-Record, California. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

]]>
Letter: Expanded college program benefits West Valley students and parents | Opinion https://top100programs.com/letter-expanded-college-program-benefits-west-valley-students-and-parents-opinion/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/letter-expanded-college-program-benefits-west-valley-students-and-parents-opinion/ To the Editor – As we look forward to the new school year, I would like to thank our West Valley high school teachers and college professors at Central Washington University for their work in developing the “College-in -the-High-School” offerings. West Valley offers over 40 dual credit courses. Administrators at both institutions have worked to […]]]>

To the Editor – As we look forward to the new school year, I would like to thank our West Valley high school teachers and college professors at Central Washington University for their work in developing the “College-in -the-High-School” offerings.

West Valley offers over 40 dual credit courses. Administrators at both institutions have worked to align these classes so that students can earn the 54 college credits needed to complete all CWU general education requirements as a prerequisite for choosing a major. West Valley teachers partner with CWU faculty to ensure the program maintains college-level rigor and options are available for various career paths.

This new program, which we call “Ram-to-Wildcat” – after our mascots – is a great way for students to plan for college and for families to save thousands of dollars. All of these courses are available without leaving the high school campus.

This new opportunity builds on our previous work with CWU to offer on-site admission as well as guaranteed admission for students with a 3.0 GPA in required courses.

I am grateful to all of the educators who have worked together to provide these incredible opportunities for our students over the next school year.

PIERRE FINCH

West Valley School District Superintendent

Yakima

]]>
President of the UW system at La Crosse, promoting a tuition-free college program – WIZM 92.3FM 1410AM https://top100programs.com/president-of-the-uw-system-at-la-crosse-promoting-a-tuition-free-college-program-wizm-92-3fm-1410am/ Tue, 16 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/president-of-the-uw-system-at-la-crosse-promoting-a-tuition-free-college-program-wizm-92-3fm-1410am/ The UW system president was in La Crosse on Tuesday to promote a tuition-free program for students from low-income families. Several thousand students attending University of Wisconsin campuses will be eligible for what is called the Wisconsin Tuition Promise, which will begin in one year at all 12 campuses, including UW-La Crosse. The program would […]]]>

The UW system president was in La Crosse on Tuesday to promote a tuition-free program for students from low-income families.

Several thousand students attending University of Wisconsin campuses will be eligible for what is called the Wisconsin Tuition Promise, which will begin in one year at all 12 campuses, including UW-La Crosse.

The program would allow students from low-income families to waive most of their tuition for up to four years on a campus in the UW system. To qualify, a student must come from a household with an annual income of less than $62,000.

UW System President Jay Rothman (center) speaks Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022, at UW-La Crosse about the new Wisconsin Tuition Promise program. Rothman is flanked by UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joe Gow (left) and UW-Platteville Chancellor Tammy Evetovich. (PHOTO: Brad Williams)

UW-La Crosse Chancellor Joe Gow said in a campus press conference with Rothman on Tuesday that he wants to see La Crosse get such a program, after it started on main campus. of Madison.

“They did that a few years ago,” Gow said, “and we were, frankly, a little envious because we wish we could do that kind of thing. And then President Rothman joined the UW system and got said, “Hey, really, let’s make this happen for all students in the UW system.”

Rothman said the cost for the first year will be around $13 million, but he ultimately hopes to pay more than $30 million a year in student expenses.

“Our key state industries,” Rothman said, “whether it’s agriculture, manufacturing, healthcare, or technology, to name a few, have absolutely need more graduates from our universities within the system.”

Rothman added that Tuition Promise will be an investment in the “war for talent,” trying to keep students in Badger State to build their careers.

Along with Rothman and Gow, UW-Platteville Chancellor Tammy Evetovich was at the press conference.

]]>
PHOTOS: Albany State University launches University College program | Slideshows https://top100programs.com/photos-albany-state-university-launches-university-college-program-slideshows/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 14:53:17 +0000 https://top100programs.com/photos-albany-state-university-launches-university-college-program-slideshows/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

]]>
Veterans honored through Del Mar College program https://top100programs.com/veterans-honored-through-del-mar-college-program/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 04:07:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/veterans-honored-through-del-mar-college-program/ CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — Del Mar College recognizes 66 veterans for completing the Veterans Upward Bound program, which helps transition veterans from military careers to civilian life through higher education. They served their country in the US military, but the training they received at Del Mar College helps make that transition to the civilian sector […]]]>

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas — Del Mar College recognizes 66 veterans for completing the Veterans Upward Bound program, which helps transition veterans from military careers to civilian life through higher education.

They served their country in the US military, but the training they received at Del Mar College helps make that transition to the civilian sector a bit easier.

Not only that, but it’s a free program funded by the Department of Education to provide support to low-income first-generation military veterans.

“I feel really good, I learned a lot of computer science, I learned to do Excel,” said veteran Gilberto Garza. “I mean, I was a mechanic and I got injured, so they’re helping me retrain and everything is something I can do a lot better, you know, work smarter, not harder.”

Garza said he’s been working towards his associate’s degree and looks forward to growing through his studies.

More 3News on KIIITV.com:

Include your name and contact information below so we can contact you about your story if we have questions or need more information. We realize that some stories are sensitive in nature. Let us know if you wish to remain anonymous.

If you don’t have a photo/video to submit, just click “OK” to skip this prompt.

]]>
NYC public university program director denies being man in pantsless photo https://top100programs.com/nyc-public-university-program-director-denies-being-man-in-pantsless-photo/ Sun, 07 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/nyc-public-university-program-director-denies-being-man-in-pantsless-photo/ The NYC public university program director claims he’s not the man with no pants in the photo he posted to Twitter with the caption ‘no kids were present for this blackmail photo “ J. Michael Steele, 52, of the City University of New York, posted a photo on Thursday of a man walking around a […]]]>

The NYC public university program director claims he’s not the man with no pants in the photo he posted to Twitter with the caption ‘no kids were present for this blackmail photo “

  • J. Michael Steele, 52, of the City University of New York, posted a photo on Thursday of a man walking around a classroom with no pants on
  • Steele joked about the hot weather while posting a photo of the pantless man, who was wearing only sneakers, a shirt and a face mask
  • He has since taken the photo and denied being the man in the photo
  • CUNY apologized for the educator post and said the school system is taking appropriate action in response to the incident

The director of the City University of New York program aimed at exposing young students to college courses denied being the man with no pants in a tweet he posted on social media.

J. Michael Steele, 52, who works for CUNY’s Early College Initiative, posted a photo of a man walking around a classroom without pants, wearing only a striped shirt, black sneakers and a mask COVID.

Providing as little context as possible, Steele used the image to poke fun at the 90-degree temperature in New York City.

‘When it’s hot outside and inside. It’s Pom Pom shorts time,’ Steele tweeted Thursday. “No children were present for this blackmail photo.”

He told the New York Post that he wasn’t the man in the photo, but he wouldn’t say who the poorly dressed man was. The man in the photo, however, has a tattoo on his left arm similar to Steele’s.

J. Michael Steele, 52, of the City University of New York, posted a photo on Thursday of a man walking around a classroom with no pants on

Steele (above) participates in CUNY's Early College initiative, which offers students in grades six through 12 the opportunity to take college-prep courses.  He has since taken the picture and denied being the man with no pants

Steele (above) participates in CUNY’s Early College initiative, which offers students in grades six through 12 the opportunity to take college-prep courses. He has since taken the picture and denied being the man with no pants

CUNY has since taken

Steele shows off a tattoo on his left arm similar to that of the man with no pants

CUNY apologized for the educator post and said appropriate action was now being taken

The post sparked outrage online, prompting CUNY to step in and apologize for the incident.

“This post was brought to our attention and subsequently deleted and appropriate action is being taken,” the university said in a statement. “CUNY is committed to providing an appropriate learning environment for all of its students.”

Steele, a former teacher and principal from Massachusetts and Detroit, worked for 10 years with students in grades 6 through 12, helping them take college-prep courses that earn them college credit.

Following the backlash, Steele has since deleted the post and made his Twitter account private.

CUNY officials said the university does not comment on personnel matters when discussing Steele’s position.

Although the original post no longer exists, it was retweeted, with many taking to social media to further ridicule the pantsless man, while others expressed frustration at the partial nudity in a public school.

Twitter user Tess T. Eccles-Brown mocked the man in a sarcastic tweet applauding him for his commitment to staying comfortable to create a proper teaching environment.

“I wish all teachers were as comfortable with themselves as this guy,” she wrote. ‘Imagine how free he feels. A great environment to learn!’

Many took to social media to express their outrage and mock their pantsless man

Many took to social media to express their outrage and mock their pantsless man

Another Twitter user with the handle, Noctis Draven, appeared stunned by the photo, writing, “Seems like a legit place to take a picture like this…Do people happily send their kids to these places??? [Like]really???’

A Twitter user going by Ben was far more critical, tweeting: ‘A legitimate psychological evaluation would be a good addition to the screening process for these people.’

Another person with The Dunadan handle on Twitter couldn’t help but join in on the dozens of sarcastic comments about the man with no pants.

“I am deeply envious of his high level of professionalism,” they wrote.

Twitter user Maze, however, took a direct swipe at the man in the photo, tweeting, “It takes a lot of balls to do something so stupid.” At second glance, no.

Advertising

]]>
Monroe cancels college program, leaving more than 150 students stranded https://top100programs.com/monroe-cancels-college-program-leaving-more-than-150-students-stranded/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://top100programs.com/monroe-cancels-college-program-leaving-more-than-150-students-stranded/ EVERETT — Tate Smith has spent most of the summer waiting to find out if they will get college financial aid this fall. They will not be able to enroll in classes without help. The 17-year-old, who uses his pronouns, attends Everett Community College under the “U3” youth re-engagement program which helps students earn a […]]]>

EVERETT — Tate Smith has spent most of the summer waiting to find out if they will get college financial aid this fall. They will not be able to enroll in classes without help.

The 17-year-old, who uses his pronouns, attends Everett Community College under the “U3” youth re-engagement program which helps students earn a free high school diploma and college degree. For more than 20 years, the Monroe School District has covered the student bill. But in April, Smith and nearly 150 other U3 students learned that the program would lose its longtime funding partner on September 1.

“My adviser basically emailed all the students and just said, ‘We’ve lost our funding. Apply for financial assistance. It really sucks,” Smith said.

Two competing narratives have emerged as to why the district ended its partnership. School trustees told U3 students in an email that this was due to Monroe’s school operations tax failure in the February election, but the school district disputes that.

Either way, the end of the partnership leaves dozens of U3 students on the hook this fall as the college scrambles to ‘rethink’ its curriculum and find new partners.

“We are talking to different school districts in the area, trying to form partnerships, so that we can continue to serve students here,” said Rebecca Hungerford, director of the U3 program. “I have every faith that it will happen. It’s just taking longer than expected.

EvCC, Monroe Schools, and the nonprofit Center for Career Alternatives launched U3 in 2000. In the partnership agreement, EvCC provided the tuition, Monroe provides the funding, and the nonprofit – since moving to Sea Mar Community Health Centers – provides employees. The program covered all costs for students, including tuition, fees, books, and other supplies. An average of 100 to 150 students have participated in the program each year, Hungerford said.

In its 2021-22 budget, the district approved nearly $917,000 of its Career and Technical Education Fund to operate U3. It was the most expensive element of this fund. Last year, 156 students enrolled in the program. Of these, 32 lived in the Monroe School District. The others were the program’s “transfer of choice” students, or those who attend a school in Monroe but live outside the district.

Monroe had a similar partnership with Shoreline Community College to operate the Center for Education and Career Opportunities. That partnership is also dissolving at the end of this month, but Shoreline representatives said they were able to find another partner to continue the program with little change for students.

Monroe School District spokeswoman Erin Zacharda said the district’s costs to partner with EvCC would have “significantly increased” this year because a waiver that exempted U3 from certain state requirements ended in the end of the 2021-22 school year. The program had operated with this waiver since 2010, when state lawmakers created Open Doors, a “statewide dropout re-engagement system” that helps students who shouldn’t be graduating from college. high school before age 21 to earn GEDs, diplomas, technical certifications, or college. degrees.

Although similar to U3, Open Doors required higher levels of staff than the local program. The waiver exempted Monroe and EvCC from these requirements.

School officials began talking in November 2021 about “phasing out this outdated curriculum,” Zacharda said. A review found that less than 3% of students completed the U3 program in four years.

“In addition to the waiver expiring, student results have not supported the continuation of the program, and similar programs are available throughout the region,” she wrote. “As a result, in February 2022, the Monroe School Board voted to discontinue the program at the end of the 2021-22 school year.”

Meanwhile, Hungerford cited a survey suggesting the program is effective – looking at the end result, rather than just whether a person has completed the program. Of 97 students who began the 2015-2016 school year, 33 had graduated within five years, 21 had earned an associate’s degree, and 10 had earned a technical certificate. Many U3 students have gone on to higher education or stable careers, she added.

“We have students who would never have seen themselves as college material or who thought they would graduate from high school, and they come here and they succeed,” Hungerford said. “They find the confidence and they fly away.”

This could be anyone from a home-schooled student who has never been to school, or someone caught up in drugs or alcohol, or someone with physical health issues or mental health that kept him from being able to attend regularly, Hungerford said.

“There are so many reasons why a traditional high school environment doesn’t work for a lot of kids,” she said.

Monroe spokeswoman Tamara Krache said high school students still have the option of earning diplomas, GEDs and college degrees through non-traditional routes. Students in Monroe, for example, can enroll in Leaders in Learning High School, the district’s “alternative” school that offers more individual learning plans.

Neighboring school districts offer Open Doors programs. However, only one school district in Snohomish County, Edmonds, operates an Open Doors program supporting college classes. The others provide diplomas or GEDs.

Many high schools also offer “Running Start” programs allowing juniors and seniors to take dual credit courses, much like U3. But Running Start students are not guaranteed to graduate. The program also uses stricter age thresholds, and students still pay personal fees for books and supplies.

U3 served a wider range of students – ages 16 to 21 – and offered direct support in the form of ‘case managers’. Students pay nothing to register.

“Unfortunately many of these (other) options are not necessarily suitable for U3 students – which is why they chose to be in U3 rather than one of these options in the first place,” said Hungerford.

Monroe informed EvCC of her decision in March. A month later, U3 advisers emailed the students.

“We were recently informed that after 21 years of serving students, Monroe has chosen to end this partnership due to the failure of their recent voter education tax,” the email reads. .

Smith, the U3 student, said he was frustrated to read that the future of his college education came down to a community vote. They plan to write Governor Jay Inslee and other state officials to “educate them on what will happen because of the tax denial.”

Hungerford said the district told the college that its decision was motivated by financial reasons, but did not directly cite the levy. This piece was “implicit,” she said.

Zacharda said while the decision saves the district money, it was not a direct result of the tax. The school board voted to discontinue the program on February 14, 2022 – four days before the election results for the failed levy were certified.

“The program would have been eliminated whether or not the levy passed,” Zacharda wrote.

Hungerford is converting U3 into an Open Doors program and she hopes to partner with several local school districts. Already, the Darrington School District is committed and plans to send at least three students, she said. But the rural district cannot accommodate choice transfer students, a key part of the original partnership that allowed U3 to serve so many students, Hungerford said.

“If we don’t have a district willing to accept transfer students by choice, that will mean U3 won’t be an option for many more students,” Hungerford said.

She is also working to get Marysville, Everett, and Lake Stevens as partners, as those cities are where the majority of U3 students live.

“Ideally what I’d like is one of our local districts to step up and say, ‘Yeah, we’re going to partner with you and we’ll take pick transfers as well,'” Hungerford said. “In this way, I would be able to serve any student.”

Smith was looking for ways to continue his college classes in the fall. They have requested financial assistance, but have not yet received a response. They were also considering signing up for Running Start.

“I’m not entirely sure if I can take fall classes,” Smith said. “The problem is getting funding for this, so I may not necessarily get funding in time to be in the fall term.”

Mallory Gruben is a Report for America staff member who writes on education for the Daily Herald.

Mallory Gruben: 425-339-3035; mallory.gruben@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @MalloryGruben.


]]>