Camden High’s academic program hailed by US Secretary of Education

Camden City School DistrictCollege and career readiness program illustrates how schools can help students recover from pandemic and thrive after graduation, says U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona.

During a tour of Camden High School, Cardona said the school’s individual post-secondary counseling program was unlike anything he had seen at other high schools.

“We want to see our students have opportunities to catch up academically, the social emotional support they need to not only recover, but to thrive post-pandemic and just have options,” he said. “That’s what I saw here today.”

Last year the Philadelphia-based nonprofit 12+ placed 10 full-time staff who specialize in post-graduation goal setting at the district’s two high schools.

The program is part of National Partnership for Student Successa coalition formed by the Ministry of Education earlier this year recruit and train 250,000 mentors and tutors across the country. They will fill roles critical to academic success and mental health, such as counsellors, career coaches and community liaisons.

School districts, nonprofits, employers, colleges and other organizations will work together to support student recovery through volunteer, mentorship and co-op programs, according to the Department of Education. ‘Education.

US Representative Donald Norcross, who joined Cardona on the tour, said there are many paths to a successful career and 12+ allows students to explore those options.

The only electrician in Congress, Norcross was thrilled to point out that a student said he wanted to study the trade.

“What we’ve seen in this classroom is about giving education its due,” he said. “Whether you want to go to college, whether you want to do military service or even become an electrician.”

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona and other government officials visited Camden High School as part of a multi-state bus tour highlighting how schools are recovering from the pandemic.

“Because if you don’t feel well, it’s harder to learn. If you’re hungry, it’s harder to learn,” he said.

Camden City School District received $116 million of the U.S. Bailout — the second-largest of any district in New Jersey — to renovate facilities, help students catch up on education, fund extracurricular activities, and support mental health staff. Camden’s allocation represents about 4% of the $2.7 billion the state received under the plan for education purposes.

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona and other government officials visited Camden High School as part of a multi-state bus tour highlighting how schools are recovering from the pandemic.

The Cardona tour concluded a week-long bus tour highlighting the ways schools across the country are helping students recover from learning loss due to the pandemic. In addition to Friday’s announcement, the Department of Education also used the tour to reveal millions of dollars in funding for other programs. This includes nearly $25 million to recruit and prepare new teachersan extra $2.5 million to support families of children with disabilities, $5.8 million to address the youth mental health crisis and more than $7 million to increase parent engagement in education.

“Look at this facility,” Cardona said of the new Camden High, which opened last year. “It sends a message to students that ‘you matter’.”

“What I saw happening inside the building was just as beautiful as the outside of the building.”

Aedy Miller is a multimedia journalist covering education, labor, climate change, mental health and their intersections for the Burlington County Times, Courier-Post and The Daily Journal. Contact them at [email protected] Support local journalism with a digital subscription.

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